High School Equivalency Frequently Asked Questions

NC Community Colleges High School Equivalency FAQs

What is the current cost to take the High School Equivalency test?

  • Beginning January 1, 2013, the High School Equivalency testing fee for paper-based tests is $35 per student for a complete battery of tests including any re-testing.
  • This one-time fee shall be charged High School Equivalency to all students who have not taken at least one paper-based test within the High School Equivalency battery prior to January 1, 2013.
  • Students who began the High School Equivalency test at the $7.50 or $25 rate prior to January 1, 2013, are not required to pay any additional fees.
  • This $35 charge will be in effect for the duration of NC Community Colleges offering paper-based testing.

I’ve already begun taking the 2002 series of High School Equivalency tests. Will I be able to continue taking these tests in 2013?

  • The 2002 series of High School Equivalency tests is currently offered via North Carolina’s community colleges. This series of tests will be available until December 31, 2013.

What’s the difference between the 2002 series of High School Equivalency tests and the new tests offered in 2014?

  • The 2002 High School Equivalency test series is comprised of five content areas: social studies, science, mathematics, reading and writing.
  • High School Equivalency Testing Service announced that a new, computer-based assessment would be aligned with state common core standards.
  • The 2014 High School Equivalency test series is comprised of four content areas: literacy, mathematics, science and social studies.
  • This new battery of tests will be launched January, 2014, replacing the 2002 battery of tests.
  • Scores from the 2002 series of High School Equivalency tests are not transferable to the 2014 assessment.

I’ve heard all High School Equivalency tests will soon be delivered via computer. What does this mean?

  • At this time, North Carolina testing locations do not offer computer-based testing. The $35 total fee noted above remains in place for paper-based testing.
  • In 2010 it was announced that, through a collaboration with Pearson Vue, High School Equivalency tests would begin a transition to computer-based testing, with all assessments being delivered via computer by January 2014.
  • System Office staff are working with High School Equivalency Chief Examiners at the colleges to implement the transition from paper to computer-based testing, beginning in summer 2013 with full implementation expected by 2014.

My testing location plans to offer computer-based tests in summer 2013. Does this mean I can no longer take the paper-based test?

  • Test-takers will continue to have the option to take the paper-based, 2002 battery of tests through December 2013.

Will computer-based tests cost more than paper-based tests?

  • High School Equivalency Testing Service currently charges a fee of $24 per test for computer-based assessments, with an additional $24 charged High School Equivalency for any re-tests.
  • Through December 2013, any computer-based testing will be offered on a self-supporting basis, meaning students taking computer-based High School Equivalency tests would be charged High School Equivalency the $24 per test fee.
  • At this time, the North Carolina Community College System has not yet identified the High School Equivalency testing fee for 2014. Any changes to High School Equivalency testing fees would require action by the State Board of Community Colleges.

Can I take the new computer based High School Equivalency online?
No, while the High School Equivalency is switching to a computer-based format, students must still come on campus to test. One of the positives of computer-based testing is that students can take any subject any work versus the current rotation of tests.