NCC Medical Assistants Earn Diplomas

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Nash Community College recently held a pinning ceremony to recognize eleven graduates from the medical assisting diploma program. Each individual completed the academic and clinical work required to become Medical Assistants as determined by the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA). According to program director Nancy Worsinger, “Some have chosen to enter the workforce at this time, while others have returned to campus this fall for additional coursework leading to an associate’s degree in applied sciences.” All of the graduates are eligible to take the national certification exam that will earn them the credential of Certified Medical Assistant, or CMA.

 

This is the seventh class of diploma students to reach this milestone since the Nash Community College program began in 2007. The college developed the program in response to the needs of the surrounding health care community and since that time, the demand for qualified medical assistants has continued to grow. The National Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 29% increase in employment for medical assistants over the next 10 years and we have seen that reflected locally in the excellent job placement rate of our graduates.

 

“The list of required courses for the diploma is very long – totaling 45 credit hours – and requires an overload every semester if completed in one year,” Worsinger said. “Since many of our students are adults with families and part-time or full-time jobs, time management skills are critical to success. I’m continually in awe of what our students are able to balance. And for many, it is the support and understanding of family and friends that make their success possible.”

 

Pictured on the front row, from left to right: Anna Owens, Elm City; Morgan Willcox, Rocky Mount; and Jessica Winstead, Wilson.  Second row: Janicia Rover, Roanoke Rapids; Maria Caudle, Rocky Mount; and Melanie Craft, Rocky Mount. Back row: Janet Silver, Louisburg; Elizabeth Hernandez, Bailey; and Shonlel Evans, Rocky Mount. Not pictured: Amber Crocker, Rocky Mount and Sonal Rathod, Rocky Mount.

Phi Theta Kappa to Host “Commitment to Completion” Signing at Nash Community College

Statistics show the surest way for anyone to land a job in their chosen field is to finish college and earn a degree or certificate. And that’s exactly what students at Nash Community College are promising to do. They are signing a mass pledge to complete their associate degrees or certificates before leaving the community college for transfer or entering the job market. Administrators, faculty and staff have also been asked to sign the pledge, committing themselves to do whatever they can to facilitate completion of student credentials.

On November 19th, students will gather to sign the completion pledge, part of a national community college movement. They will also hear from student guest speakers. The event is being hosted by Nash Community College’s Beta Upsilon Delta Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa along with the support of the Nash Community College Alumni Association and college administrators. Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society members are serving as the student arm of the Community College Completion Challenge, a national education initiative. Learn more at www.cccompletioncorps.org .

In April 2010 leaders of six national organizations representing the nation’s 1,200 community colleges signed The Call to Action, a pledge to increase student completion rates by 50 percent over the next decade. Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society was the only student organization asked to participate. Phi Theta Kappa launched the Community College Completion Corps in response to this call.

At the 2010 White House Summit for Community Colleges President Obama called for community colleges to produce an additional 5 million degrees and certificates in the next 10 years, part of a goal to restore the United States as the world’s leader in college graduates. The U.S. is now ranked 16th among industrialized countries in the percentage of citizens holding higher education credentials.

It is reported that students who complete their degrees or certificates will earn an average of $500,000 more over the course of their careers than their peers who did not complete. In addition, individuals with credentials are less likely to become unemployed than their co-workers who did not earn credentials.

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, headquartered in Jackson, Mississippi, is the largest honor society in higher education with 1,280 chapters on college campuses in all 50 of the United States, Canada, Germany, the Republic of Palau, Peru, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the British Virgin Islands, the United Arab Emirates and U.S. territorial possessions. More than two million students have been inducted since its founding in 1918, with approximately 135,000 students inducted annually. Learn more about Phi Theta Kappa at www.ptk.org .

Online Registration Open for 25th Annual Scholarship Golf Classic

GolfCommittee_02Area golfers have provided 24 years of support for the Nash Community College Foundation and its scholarship program by participating in the NCC Foundation Student Scholarship Golf Classic. Golfers will have a choice to tee off October 2nd at 8 a.m. or 1 p.m. at Benvenue Country Club in Rocky Mount for a day of challenging fun, while providing scholarships for deserving college students. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Players who select the morning tee time will receive $100 of registration. All proceeds from the golf classic will provide student scholarships and support the needs of Nash Community College. The format for this year’s tournament will be Captain’s Choice.

Register Online!

Community members may participate in the following ways:

  • $700 Sponsor/Player Package: Signage; cart and green fees for four golfers; beverages and meals
  • $600 Player Package: Cart and green fees for four golfers: beverages and meals
  • $200 Individual Player: Cart and green fee for one; beverages and meals
  • $200 Sponsorship Package: Tee or green sign; beverages and meals
  • Prize/Gift Bag Sponsor: If merchandise is valued at $200 or more, sponsor receives signage; beverages and meal

Mulligans are $40 per team (two per player) and junk packages are $50 per player including two mulligans: one throw and one red tee buster. Prizes will be awarded to each flight’s first and second-place teams. This year’s grand tournament sponsors are Content Marketing and Automation, North Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives, MBM, Oakley-Collier Architects, PNC Bank, Roger G. Taylor & Associates, Cummins, Institutional Interiors, Franklin Street Partners, Autumn Care of Nash and Sandy Cross Consultant Service. Golf carts are sponsored by McLane. 2014 Hospitality/Event Contributors are Benvenue Country Club, Carolina Eagle Budweiser, Inc., Davenport Autopark, North Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives and Speight’s Trophy Shop. Davenport Autopark is the hole-in-one sponsor.

Under the leadership of Tournament Chair, Phil Dixon, members of the golf committee coordinating the event are pictured from left: Providence Bank Vice President and Information Technology Officer Lyn Brown, NCC Vice President for Instruction and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Trent Mohrbutter, NCC Coordinator of Alumni and Annual Programs Melissa Sykes, First South Bank Senior Vice President and City Executive Lank Dunton, 2014 Golf Committee Chair Phil Dixon and CMA Chief Executive Officer Phil Dixon, Benvenue Country Club Tournament Director Rob Farmer, Century 21/The Combs Company Broker/Owner David Combs, NCC Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Annette Dishner, NCC President Dr. Bill Carver and NCC Foundation Executive Director Pat Ellis Daniels. Committee members not pictured: Nash Health Care Systems Senior Vice President Corporate Services Cam Blalock and Nash County Assistant Emergency Services Director Scott Rogers. For more information, call 252-451-8230 or visit www.nashcc.edu/golf to register online.

 

NCC Shares Innovative Practices with Community College System

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Michael Coleman, NCC Director of Counseling

Nash Community College is once again sharing proven methods of innovation — this time at the North Carolina Community College System Conference being held in Raleigh October 12-14, 2014.
The spotlight is on the college’s implementation of technology in its Student and Enrollment Services office, to streamline the workflow process and minimize student wait time. Michael Coleman, Director of Counseling at Nash Community College, will present “In House Electronic Sign-In System for Practically No Cost” at the system conference. The office houses admissions, financial aid, the registrar, and provides assistance to students registering for classes, and seeking counseling.

The college’s former process for seeing students in the Student and Enrollment Services office required individuals to sign in using a paper sign-in sheet at the front desk. A front desk staff member would then notify other staff members individually by phone until an available employee was located. The system caused delays, increased room for error, and allowed no process for tracking the number of individuals signed in or anticipate their needs.

After reviewing several companies that would charge as much as $30,000 for an electronic solution to improve the process, NCC decided to create an in-house solution. Using Google Docs, iPads, and the college’s website, NCC staff created an electronic sign-in system that has increased efficiency, record keeping, and customer service — all for less than $1,000 in equipment costs.

Since implementation in February 2013, the electronic sign-in system has significantly increased the efficiency and speed at which Student and Enrollment Services employees have been able to assist students, decreasing student overall wait times. Staff members now have the ability to monitor students signing in from their office, which means they can research students’ needs immediately and many times, staff members are able to provide answers and resolve issues in their initial contact with the student.

Even more impressive, is the ability of staff members to access the sign-in sheet on their smart phone or tablet. This means staff members can be away from their desk and still observe how many students are signing-in in real time. If a department director is off campus and observes a sudden influx in student traffic, they can quickly make a few calls and pull staff members to assist.

Additionally, with the electronic sign-in system, the department is now able to keep electronic records which can be used to make staffing decisions during peak times. Such reporting can also provide analytics including information about peak traffic and wait times, the types of questions students have, and the departments that are seeing the most traffic. Searches within the system can also find specific student information such as what days, times, and needs a particular student had each time they signed in. The system has been so effective, Student and Enrollment Services plans on adding more iPad devices in the future to further enhance students’ ability to quickly get the answers they need.

At the conference, Coleman will walk attendees through setting up their own electronic sign-in system. As an alumnus of the college holding an Associate in Applied Science in Architectural Technology, Coleman speaks from experience, knowing firsthand how improved processes and increased efficiency can benefit students. After graduating from Nash, Michael Coleman attended Liberty University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Religion and Master’s degrees in both Religion and Business Administration. He is currently pursuing his Doctorate of Business Administration at Liberty University. Coleman has been employed at the college since 2007.

Retired NCC Professor and Scotland County Native to Present Civil War Program

MaryWayneWatson_02Scotland County native Dr. Mary Wayne Watson, retired Nash Community College Professor and Road Scholar with the NC Humanities Council, will present a program on Sandhills women’s perspectives of the American Civil War. The event, co-sponsored by the Richmond Historical Society, is set for 7:00 p.m. on September 15, 2014, at Rockingham City Hall in Rockingham, NC. Watson’s presentation is titled “Women’s Attitudes towards Secession and the Civil War.”

Research on the work of her great uncle, North Carolina Poet Laureate John Charles McNeill, as well as her cousin, Gerald White Johnson, noted historian and journalist, both from Scotland County, motivated Watson to look further into her family’s history. In so doing she discovered a series of letters written during the Civil War by her great-grandmother in Scotland County to a family in Moore County.

The program presents a fascinating look at women’s views during the beginning, middle, and end of the Civil War period in North Carolina.

An initially uplifting, idealistic support of the Union as a great experiment in democracy and self-rule ultimately fades into prayers for return of the surviving men as well as hopes for peace, followed by ultimate acceptance of the bitter realities of war on a land and a people crushed in the aftermath. Poignant descriptions of the impact of Sherman’s “scorched earth policy” on a once proud and surprisingly literary Sandhills community remind us once again that war is hell–even when it is brother against sister.

Watson received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia and her Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has taught at middle schools, high schools, community colleges, and universities in North Carolina and Virginia.

A Sweet Pursuit of Lifelong Learning

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NCC alumna Winde Jackson (right) with cake designer Wayne Steinkopf

Nash Community College alumna Winde Jackson has made a commitment to lifelong learning. She earned Associate in Applied Science degrees from Nash Community College in Networking Technology and Computer Information Systems Technology. Later she graduated from East Carolina University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Hospitality Management with a concentration in Food and Beverage, and a minor in Business Administration. Jackson is currently enrolled in Nash Community College’s Culinary Arts degree program.

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Cake design by NCC alumna Winde Jackson featuring two cake lace mats developed by Claire Bowman

She recently attended a class taught by Wayne Steinkopf, owner of Swank Cake Design in Cary, NC, to advance her skills in cake design. “The cake I made features one of the newest design trends using two cake lace mats developed by Claire Bowman,” Jackson said. Steinkopf teaches classes throughout the United States at cake shows, conventions and other locations, sharing best practices and teaching bakers the latest techniques and trends. “I just don’t feel like in this field you can ever stop learning,” she said.

When she is not in the classroom, Winde Jackson is the baker at Lou Reda’s: an American Table. She also creates delicious treats for local weddings, parties and other celebrations through her baking business, and assists with baking at Rose Hill Plantation in Nashville, NC during banquets. “I am blessed and very fortunate that Nash has such great chefs and instructors. They are really great at answering and explaining and being there outside of class time when you have questions and problems.” Jackson is currently seeking an investor as she hopes to own a full bakery in Rocky Mount one day.

 

Banned Books Week is September 22-26!

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Banned Books Trivia!

1. This perky coming of age story about a teenaged boy, in both book and movie format was banned for “graphic teenage sex, homosexuality, and drugs.”

Perks of Being a Wallflower

 

2. What autobiographical story of a young Native American cartoonist who chooses a life off of the reservation has been banned for “pornographic language” and scenes depicting sex and violence?

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

 

3. Which magical seven book series, as well as the accompanying films, has been banned for promotion of witchcraft, being too dark, setting bad examples for youth, and being “anti-family?”

Harry Potter Series

 

4. A semi-autobiographical science fiction novel involving time travel has been banned for being pornographic, glorifying drinking, cursing, and premarital sex.

Slaughterhouse Five

 

5. Which adventurous book was banned for portraying humans and animals on the same level?

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

6. What famous book, ironically about censorship, finds itself repeatedly on the banned and challenged books list?

Farenheit 451

 

7. What play penned by a famous Bard, was banned on shaky grounds because of a cross-dressing female as well as a suspected gay male character?

Twelfth Night

 

8. This incredibly popular best seller has been translated into many languages, and was banned due to sexual content and violence against women, among other complaints.

The Bible

 

9. Which book about coming of age in1930’s Alabama, characterizing the trial of an African American man accused of attacking a young Caucasian girl, has been banned for offensive language and racism?

To Kill A Mockingbird

 

10. What banned book tells the story of a young girl who faces down a deadly cyclone and soon afterwards finds herself among strangers and forced to adapt, while wearing someone else’s shoes?

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

 

11. This banned book features an orphaned boy sent to live with two terrible aunts, who are soon crushed by vegetation. It has been banned for offensive language and anti-family content.

James and the Giant Peach

 

12. What popular teenage romance series featuring a large adoptive family interacting with local residents has been banned for religious viewpoints, violence, sexual explicity, and unsuitability for the audience?

Twilight

 

13. A boy goes to boarding school, where he learns a new sport, makes new friends, gets into trouble, and learns to battle evil. The story was banned because it “promotes the occult.” Can you guess the book?

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone